Last year’s Brexit vote has fuelled the trend of UK companies trading from British shores, in what is known as ‘reshoring’. The move is being put down to a weak pound that in turn has increased the cost of imported materials and goods.

Paul Neath, director of Skymark – the UK flexible packaging manufacturer, said: “The fallout from Brexit – including a weak pound and potential disruption to supply chains – means that many UK companies are starting to think about reversing the offshoring trend and bringing manufacturing back to the UK. By moving production to the UK, it eliminates the need to pay rising costs required by overseas suppliers and we’re starting to see this move bring new business opportunities in the print and packaging industry.”

Brands like Cadbury are leading the reshoring movement as the world famous British brand is reinvesting in its historic factory in Bournville, moving manufacturing from Poland back to Birmingham. Another renowned company is supercar marker McLaren, which is ploughing £50m into a hi-tech factory in Sheffield where its carbon chassis parts, which were once produced in Austria, will be made.

Skymark produces a wide range of flexible packaging solutions for the food, hygiene and personal care and medical packaging markets.

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Established in 1987, Skymark has two UK manufacturing sites in Scunthorpe and Ilkeston and currently exports 35% of its products to more than 20 countries. For 30 years, the company has delivered products and services to a wide variety of market sectors and today employs over 240 people in the UK.

Neath added: “Working with local suppliers in the UK offers a level of flexibility, responsiveness and co-operation that is difficult to achieve when sourcing from overseas. I also believe reshoring the manufacturing base will improve supply chains and lead to greater productivity, which has recently been talked about as a UK wide problem in the media.”

A report by Ernst and Young in 2015 claimed bringing manufacturing back to the UK was a ‘once in a generation’ opportunity that could provide a £15bn boost to the economy and create 315,000 jobs. However, reshoring itself presents businesses with a new range of challenges. Moving manufacturing back to Britain means a big investment for any print and packaging company in new lines, factories or plants with firms wary about their operations being interrupted during the process.

While reshoring could create more jobs, some businesses are concerned over a lack of skilled labour in the UK. However, Skymark believes this offers fresh opportunity for the industry to increase training opportunities that can help develop the next wave of workers.

The company said it is an investment worth making and the reshoring of British companies could represent a significant opportunity for businesses looking to pick up new contracts while boosting productivity and improving the cost and quality of products and materials.

According to Neath, the real test for manufacturers is not the change that Brexit brings, but how they respond to the change: “I believe British companies should turn uncertainty into opportunity. While the details of Brexit are still unclear, Brexit gives the UK a host of new opportunities which could add significant value to business of all sizes,” he said.

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Sensitive, delicate time for victims

by admin on October 10, 2017

In the aftermath of the recent shocking gun violence in Las Vegas, we mourn the loss of so many of our fellow citizens, and our hearts naturally go out to the victims’ family members and friends. But at the same time, we should be deeply sensitive to the tender feelings of another group of victims who suffer terrible emotional damage in these tragedies: America’s gun owners.

Here we’re not talking about those who might own a couple of hunting rifles or a handgun for home security, by the way. We are referring to the truly dedicated, legendary Gun Loons among us. That means the wild-eyed guy who lives in the woods and dresses in camo, with a basement full of weapons and crates of ammunition, as well as cases of Van Kamp’s Pork and Beans and Snickers bars, as a hedge against the Apocalypse.

It also refers to your more unassuming guy next door: the one who keeps a closetful of 30 or 40 weapons of all sizes and shapes, just because you never know what mood you’ll be in when you head to the shooting range. Green Beret? Dirty Harry? Yosemite Sam? One needs flexibility. This is the guy who frequents the crème de la crème of paranoid, macho websites, which have convinced him that the government is coming to implant an obedience chip in his #14 molar.

It’s these victims and their ilk who desperately need and deserve our heartfelt sympathy.

Imagine the hell these poor souls must endure, the debilitating fear of losing any of their loved ones—even a single precious firearm—to Dark Government Forces. The agony of waiting for that inevitable, ominous knock at the door. Of course, it might just be a guy selling solar panels, or a couple of Girl Scouts selling cookies, or even a nice, chatty Jehovah’s Witness offering a colorfully-illustrated pamphlet about why the world is ruled by Satan.

But it also might be a full platoon of officers from the U.S. Deep State Gun Confiscation Agency, announcing that the house is surrounded, that all the guy’s weapons are forfeit, that they’ve canceled his Comcast Ultimate Sports Package, exploded both of his Jet Skis, and sold his wife into white slavery. In other words: the Apocalypse.

What the rest of us must understand in extending our sincere sympathy is that these people are gripped by a sickness. It’s a disease, like scabies or gonorrhea or alcoholism or any other physical malady, and we must avoid stigmatizing the victims by assuming they’re making the choice to be sick. No one knows the deep sources of this pathology, though we do know that it afflicts the United States far more severely than, say, England or Germany. Or Japan or Australia. Or France or Canada. Or—well, just about anywhere else.

If you can get one of these poor souls to a meeting of Firearms Anonymous, for God’s sake do it. It will be slow going. When told to surrender to a higher power, they will respond, “You mean the NRA?” You must be patient.

When they repeatedly tell you that nothing can be done about gun violence, that “guns don’t kill people, people do,” and that “only a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun,” or even, as Bill O’Reilly recently said, these tragic massacres are just “the price of freedom,” you must believe that they really don’t mean that we as a nation should do absolutely nothing about trying to reduce the number of these senseless murders. They don’t mean to just shrug. They don’t mean that if we could find a way to prevent even, say, one in five mass shootings that it wouldn’t be worth trying. They are simply in the grip of this terrible disease.

You will find, unfortunately, that the sickness renders them impervious to facts. You can cite all the grim statistics: the 93 Americans who are killed with guns every day, the seven children or teens killed each day, and that America’s homicide rate is 25 times the average of other developed countries. None of it will matter to them.

In this way, their pathology is similar to that of Donald Trump’s supporters. Which is to say, nothing matters but the object of their desire. There is no logic, no fact, no evidence that will shake them from the trance of their illness. In the Gun Loon’s case, it’s the need to own firepower far beyond the needs of self-defense or sport. In the Trump booster’s case, it’s the drive to give unqualified support to a demonstrated fraud, thus testing just how much damage this system of government can absorb before collapsing.

Remember: Patience in the face of madness is never easy.

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Reduce Lead Time in Your Global Supply Chain with Lean Thinking

October 10, 2017
Short-term capacity issues at your suppliers. • Poor communication and errors. Unlike geography, which you can do nothing about (unless you reshore the product), all these other factors are controllable. In other words, the majority of the lead time from …
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September 2017 Digital Issue: Plastic bearings step up to the plate + more

October 10, 2017
Some recent commentary from the Reshoring Initiative’s president, Harry Moser and John Stoneback, president of Fairport Harbor, Ohio-based JM Performance Products brought some of these issues into focus. The key driving variable to offshore was low labor …
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US Manufacturing | The Reshoring Is Real, The Jobs Are Not | In the News

October 9, 2017
As costs rise in developing countries, and automation eliminates the most mindless tasks, some manufacturing and service businesses are going home—but with greatly reduced labor needs. A different equation pertains to reshoring decisions on white-collar …
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MEMA Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association : Third MEMA Policy Breakfast to Focus on NAFTA in Midst of Renegotiation Talks

October 9, 2017
The October 12 Policy Breakfast will take a deep dive into some of the challenges of renegotiating or modernizing the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), including rules of origin, sourcing materials and reshoring jobs, and other aspects of the …
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Immersion programme

October 9, 2017
There was another discussion on ‘Globalization of Business Services’ and how decisions of offshoring, nearshoring, onshoring and reshoring are affecting the outsourcing industry globally. During the industrial visits, the students had the opportunity …
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AM UK National Strategy: Britain aims to survive Brexit by becoming global 3D printing leader

October 9, 2017
“It has already supported research into AM with over £200 million ($264 million) of funding over the last five years—a vital investment which will help us to reshore services that have already disappeared overseas.” There are, however, particular …
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NZSO’s Dynamic 2018 season

October 8, 2017
The effervescent Canadian-German cellist Johannes Moser returns, this time performing Shostakovich … including works by John Williams from Harry Potter in the Summer Pops tour at the start of the year. There has been a global trend by orchestras …
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Wanderlust drives travel boom

October 8, 2017
Shopping dropped eight percentage points of total spending share since 2015. This is partly due to the broader “reshoring” of luxury sales back to the People’s Republic, where Louis Vuitton bags and other items often retail for far more than in Paris …
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